Sunday, April 22, 2018

Caballeria de Linea - Regimiento Algarve

    The Spanish Heavy Cavalry ("Line Cavalry"), like their infantry brethren, saw their uniforms undergo numerous changes in the earlier part of the Napoleonic Wars. in the late 1780's to 1790's, the regimnents wore coats in varied colors by regiment (dark blue, white, or scarlet) with regimental facing colors. In 1796, all regimnents changed to white coats with scarlet turnbacks and regimental facing colors. In 1800, the Cavalry of the Line wore dark blue coats with scarlet turnback and piping, buff breeches and waistcoats, pewter buttons, white lace on the beicornes, and scarlet saddle blankets edged in white. The regimental facing colors were as per the table below.



Spanish Line Cavalry, 1800 facing colors

Regiment
Collar
Cuffs
Lapels
Rey
Scarlet
Scarlet
Violet
Reina
Violet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Principe
Scarlet
Scarlet

Infante
White
Violet
White
Borbon
White
White
Scarlet
Farnesio
Scarlet
Scarlet
White
Alcantara
Green
Green
Green
Espana
Black
Black
Black
Algarve
Sky Blue
Sky Blue
Buff
Calatrava
Scarlet
White
Scarlet
Santiago
Crimson
Crimson
Crimson
Montessa
White
Buff
White
Carabineros
Sky Blue
Sky Blue
Sky Blue


In 1802, the  uniform changed yet again, now with all units dressed the same, namely dark blue coats with white lapels, crimson collars, cuffs,  and turnbacks, all of which were piped in white. The lapels were piped in crimson. The buttons were brass and the waistcoats yellow. The bicorns had a yellow lace edging. The pants were blue with a crimson stripe.

Still another change occurred in the uniforms of the Heavy Cavalry in 1805, with a return to regimental facings on the dark blue coats, and a return to buff breeches and waistcoats. The saddle blankets remained dark blue, with the piping on the shabraques and the lace edging on the bicorns being in the regimental button color (yellow or white).


Spanish Line Cavalry, 1805 facing colors


Regiment
Collar
Cuffs
Lapels
Piping
Turnbacks
Buttons
Rey
Scarlet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Brass
Reina
Sky Blue
Sky Blue
Sky Blue
Scarlet
Scarlet
Pewter
Principe
Scarlet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Brass
Infante
White
White
White
White
Scarlet
Brass
Borbon
Scarlet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Pewter
Farnesio
Scarlet
Scarlet
Scarlet
Buff
Scarlet
Pewter
Alcantara
Buff
Scarlet
Buff
Scarlet
Green
Pewter
Espana
Buff
Crimson*
Crimson*
Scarlet
Scarlet
Pewter
Algarve
Buff
Buff
Buff
Scarlet
Scarlet
Pewter
Calatrava
Scarlet
Sky Blue
Sky Blue
Scarlet
Scarlet
Pewter
Santiago
Crimson
Crimson
Crimson
Scarlet
Scarlet
Pewter
Montessa
Crimson*
Crimson*
White
Scarlet
Scarlet
Pewter

* = piping in the text color (buff or white).


This is the Algarve regiment of Line Cavalry; once again the trumpeter and standard bearer will be added soon.


Being a regiment with Pewter buttons, the lace on the bicorn and the trim on the shabraques is white, as opposed to the yellow seen previously with the Regimiento del Rey. 


These are once again Brigade Games figures, sculpts b y Paul Hicks. 


This shot shows the buff color of the collars better. Curiously, the Algarve is the Southernmost  region of Portugal, now days famous for its beaches. It was occupied by Spain from 1807 - 1808 as part of the joint invasion of Portugal with the French.


They look quite dapper astride their chestnut horses, eh?!

Friday, April 20, 2018

Mounted Spanish Officers


With our Snappy Nappy Peninsular Campaign in a Day just a little over a week away, I needed some more Spanish Command figures. 


I had 2 "left over" officer figures from my Brigade Games Dragoon regiments, so they were called up for service!


The blue saddle blanket is a documented but not officially sanctioned variant for Generals; I used it for variety. 


Likewise the light blue sash - doubtless of some foreign military Order!


I should probably go back and "black line" the gold/red transition on the (official) red saddle blanket.



I have a lot more troop nearing completion in time for the event. I may or may not be able to post them all before then!

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

The Lodestone Kickstarter - "modular magnetic tabletop buildings"

  I happened across this Kickstarter which I hadn't seen promoted, and I thought the concept was very clever. The idea is to use some standard box configurations as the skeleton to which fully pre-painted mdf  "skins are affixed, using strong earth magnets. This allows rapid assembly and disassembly, and reduced storage needs.   What's more,  the same basic boxes can potentially have a wide variety of different genre "skins" that can be used with them. They are currently looking at doing Sci-Fi, Western, and Gothic Fantasy, but imagine Mediterranean, Russian, and French skins for the Napoleonic era, Middle eastern skins, Oriental skins, Modern skins, Medieval skins, ACW skins....  all re using the same basic boxes as a framework. A huge variety of buildings would be possible with greatly reduced storage needs. The buildings look to be geared to 25/28 mm figures (confirmed), without having overly large footprints.

Check out their  Kickstarter (a very well done presentation) if you are so inclined! I have no connection to these guys in any fashion, nor any idea how likely they are to be able to deliver the product (due May 2019). It looks like they showed the prototypes at Salute this month, though.


In my opinion, it takes a Village....




Sunday, April 15, 2018

Caballeria de la Linea - Regimiento del Rey

The King's regiment of Heavy Cavalry was the oldest in the Kingdom, having been raised originally in Milan, then controlled by the Spanish, in 1536. It was part of the Spanish forces sent to Denmark in 1807 under the Marquis de la Romana. It was returned to the Peninsula, sons horses, by the Brityish in 1808, and, after securing remounts, it fought at the battles of Ucles, Medellin, Talavera, Ocana, and Sagunto.







For the duration of the Peninsular War, the regiment wore this uniform - dark blue coats with red collar, cuffs, lapels and turnbacks, brass buttons, buff breeches, and yellow edging to the bicorne and saddle blankets.


These are more excellent 28 mm Brigade Games figures, sculpted by Paul Hicks. Note the detail on the pockets on the back of the coats!


The unit should have 2 more figures, a trumpeter and a standard bearer (plus an officer, which I recycle as a General!). I have been waiting for Brigade Games to release the command set for these troops since July, but nothing yet. With the local version of the Talavera "Campaign in a Day" in 2 weeks, I just went ahead and painted the troopers without the command.


If need be, I can use the Dragoon command set, as there seems to be little difference in the cut of the uniform. We will see. Brigade games has been releasing quite a few Spanish/Peninsular War figures this month! The flag for this unit has the emblem of Milan on the reverse - a snake swallowing a man, a nod to it's origin in that city.


The regiment performed what was perhaps the most effective cavalry charge by the Spanish of the war at the battle of Talavera, where it scattered the infantry of the Confederation of the Rhine and captured a battery. 

Sunday, April 1, 2018

Regimiento de Infanteria de Linea "Rey Immemorial"

For the sake of variety, I painted this regiment, the King's Own, in the earlier 1802 uniform. It is the oldest unit in the Spanish Army, originating before Spain was even a Kingdom. 


This uniform was a radical departure from the traditional white coats of Spanish infantry, and their individual facing colors. 


Instead all units were to wear an identical uniform featuring a dark sky blue coat with black collar, cuffs, and lapels. The shoulder straps and turnbacks were scarlet. 


The lapels and collars were piped scarlet; sources vary about the cuffs being piped scarlet as well, but Spanish sources seem to indicate they were left plain. 


All units had brass buttons and collar emblems.


The usual red plume and red cockade of Spanish troops were worn with this uniform as well. Many of the troops in the Romana Division sent to the Baltic for service with the French were still wearing this uniform in 1807, despite the regulation changing back to white with varied facings in 1805.


I also painted the last of the Front Rank Spanish Grenadiers that In bought way back in 2009. 


One company is in the same 1802 uniform, and the other is in the 1805 white uniform. If I remember correctly, the light blue facings are those of the Valencia regiment. 


Once again, those magnificent bearskins!


The flag is that of the Valencia regiment., once again by Adolfo Ramos.


The figure on the far right is a sapper, wearing a modified and shorter version of the Grenadier bearskin.