Sunday, June 10, 2018

Hills of Iron, Silver and Gold, and Iron Mules

Back in January I backed my second Kickstarter, "Hills of Iron, Silver, and Gold".  I went for one of the biggest pledges, 3 "Hills of Iron" ("small"), and one each of Silver (medium), and Gold (Large). The arrived on my doorstep from the UK last week in a big, well padded box.


Hill of Iron #1. Is that nicely done, or what?!


Hill of Iron #2; each hill is unique. 


Hill of Iron #3; these "small" hills are roughly 15 x 24 cm. 


Hill of Silver; a "medium" hill, approximately 20 x 30 cm


Hill of Gold; a "large" hill, in this case partially with 2 levels. 


View of the escarpment end of the Hill of Gold; approximately 25 x 40 cm.



A week ago we attended the 5th annual antique tractor show at Topland Farms in Roxbury, CT, less than 5 miles from our home. The owner of the farm collects antique tractors and related farm equipment dating from 1911 to 1934. As y6ou can  see, the resmblance3 to locomotive engines can be striking in some of these old machines - at least 20 of which were powered up for the parade.


No rubber tires on these - all cast iron!


The collection includes 100's of these early machines, some weighing m ore than 10 tons!


I would imagine these must have been delivered by rail!


It is hard to see, but this model has a pipe running across the front of the tractor. It carries water from the engine, and has holes in the bottom of the pipe that lets the water cascade down  an open "radiator" of ? Canvas; the water is then piacked up from the pan at the bottom and reciculated to cool the engine!


Note the cast iron "treads"!


A much smaller, later model. 


Note the huge smokestack; this one chugged and backfired regularly, emitting lots of smoke, but drove along smoothly!

Note the enormous fly wheel; this seemed to be used in starting the engine. 


Look at the size of this one; there are far bigger ones in the 5 sheds housing other pieces of equipment. 


The resemblance to an "iron horse" is obvious here!


All of these were manufactured at various sites in the Midwest. It is likely they were only really useful there, where the ground was pretty much flat. 


A later, more compact version. 


Th tans at the back hold gasoline, kerosene, and water.


Note the huger smokestack once again.


Another, more "modern" tractor. 


 Still with the large fly wheel. Don't get your hand caught in that!



 Part of the parade from behind.


 Great for some new "Steampunk:" ideas, eh?


Note the hiuge smokestack again.


Yes, they can back up!


 Looks almost fragile compared to some of the others!


No canopy on this later model, but note the huge spikes for tread!


The Empress, Princess Kate and her husband, Greg, and grandsons Owen and Oliver. Owen (in carriage) LOVES tractors. I must have lifted him up onto the the drivers seat of at least 2 dozen!


There's actually a you-tube video of this year's show...


20 comments:

  1. Great looking hills...and splendid collection of vehicles!

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    1. Merci, Phil! Glad you liked them both!

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  2. Those are fantastic hills, I wish I had seen that kickstarter.

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    1. I didn't publicize this one as it was already funded by the time I signed on. Also, as you might expect, shipping from the UK was pricey, but still worth it.

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  3. Lol , my dad's '53 Allis-Chalmers would look postively new-fangled at that show.

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    1. 1953 would be about the age of the very "newest" things in the barns! :-)

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  4. The hills look exquisite. Also looks like a great time out with the Grandkids.

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    1. Thanks, Jake. I am very happy with the hills, and we found the tractor event to be far more interesting that we would have ever imagined.

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  5. The hills look really great - you will find loads of uses for them!

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    1. Thanks, Oli. Hills definitely come in handy for sure!

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  6. Great looking hills and fun steam rally!
    Best Iain

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  7. Those hills do look good, and appear as though they will allow a number of bases to be positioned without them falling over or sliding off.

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    1. I agree, they look pretty practical for gaming as well as beautifully done!

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  8. Replies
    1. Thanks, Mark. I hope he does this again!

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  9. Brilliant post Peter. The hills are fantastic and look like they will it into your wonderful collection very well. The shots of the Tractor show were outstanding and the people who have preserved and maintain these pieces of history deserve high praise indeed. Great to see your wonderful family enjoyed the show as well - its what lifes all about!

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    1. Thanks, Carlo. The show wound up being far more interesting than I would have ever imagined, and I got to spend a lot of time with Owen (and give his parents a break, LOL!).

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  10. Those hills are beaut, but I love those tractors. Such a range, fabulous.

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    1. Thanks, James. There were literally another hundred or so more in the sheds, in great varieties, some truly enormous!

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