Wednesday, July 2, 2014

2nd Regiment, Grenadiers a Pied de la Garde Imperiale

 Unlike the 1st Regiment, the history of the 2nd regiment of Imperial Guard Grenadiers is somewhat convoluted! A second regiment of Grenadiers of the Guard was initially raised on April 15, 1806, but it was absorbed back into the first regiment in 1809. A new 2nd Regiment was raised from the Dutch Royal Guard  on September 13, 1810 as a consequence of the amalgamation of  the Kingdom of Holland with France. On May 11, 1811, however, the Dutch Grenadiers were re-numbered as the 3rd Regiment, and a new (French) 2nd Grenadier regiment was again raised. Disbanded after Napoleon's first abdication in 1814, the 2nd regiment was raised again for the last time on May 9, 1815. It was dissolved for the third and final time on September 24, 1815.


This picture shows the officer's distinctions well - gold cords on the bearskins, gold epaulets, gold buttons. Note also the red and gold bandoleer for supporting the Eagle. Like the 2nd Chasseurs posted last month, these are 28mm Essex figures.


This shot shows the gold piping on the collar, cuffs, lapels and turnbacks of the drummer, and the red mixed with gold cords and epaulets of the NCO.


I used a wash of  CC Wedgewood to bring out the details in the breeches and the lapels; also dry brushing of the red plumes and epaulet with CC Adobe Red, and the bearskins with CC Hippo Grey to bring out some of the details there as well. 


This rear view shows the white grenade emblems on the "patch" of the Grenadier's bearskins well, and also the "aurore" grenade ornaments on the red turnbacks. The Grenadiers are reaching into their cartridge boxes, and preparing to load their muskets. "What has it got in its nasty, little pocket-etses?" A rather unusual pose, but I think the unit came out looking well. 


This 2nd Regiment of Grenadiers a Pied of the Imperial Guard completes the last of the new units I need for my Montmirail games at Historicon in 2 weeks. Now if I can just get my workhorse Epson CX6600 Printer/Scanner/Copier/Card Reader to work with Windows 8.1, I can print out their flags and the Grognards will be ready to appear upon the field of honor. If not, I may have to hook it up to my old Windows XP machine again!




La Marche Des Bonnets À Poils
*The* March of the Old Guard!

23 comments:

  1. Fielding of the Imperial Guard seems to be a contagion lately. Like you, many are fielding the guard. Perhaps everyone is gearing up for the 100 Days?

    Very handsome guardsmen, Peter, and one my favorite units of yours. Some of your finest brushwork yet!

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    1. I will confess that part of my thinking in raising these new Guard infantry regiments was that they would be ready for Ligny and Quatre Bras next year, so you may be onto something there!

      I'm glad you like them, Jon. I was very pleased with how they came out, as well!

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    2. One benefit to reserving the guard until last in the painting queue is that their uniforms will look freshly pressed and pristine while the others will look a little shabby from past campaigning. Just how the guard should look!

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  2. Nice unit to paint up, well done. I wasn't aware of the 2nd Regiment, Grenadiers a Pied de la Garde Imperiale history, very interesting to read about.

    I have a question, going by my memory banks, did a Prussian Landwehr Regiment at Ligny 1815 or during the 1814 winter campaign in France disordered/retreat (rout?) a Imperial Guard Battalion?

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    1. Thanks, Phil. I imagine iot depends on the source - French or Prussian! It wouldn't be that shocking if a Prussian Landwehr battalion defeated a 3rd or 4th Guard Grenaider regiment at Ligny - the 3rd and 4th regts were certainly not up to the old standard, and many of the Prussian Landwehr in 1815 were pretty veteran unkits, having seen a lot of combat in 1813 and 1814.

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    2. BYW, Lachouque's "The Anatomy of Glory" has the history of all the Guard regiments in one of the Appendices; that's where the opening paragraph is adapted from.

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  3. Excellent paint job for this famous unit, always impressive on a battlefield!

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  4. Great looking regiment and nice to get the history.

    If you are still struggling with your printer you may find dropping the flags into word may sort it out for you. Not sure if it will reduce the quality of the images though

    Ian

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  5. Thanks, Ian! That is actually how I usually print flags. The issues is with the printer driver most likley, although I have updated it to no avail.

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  6. I've just completed the 2nd Grenadiers as we'll - still you can never have too many Old Guard! Yours look very smart...

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    1. Thanks; I'm sure yours came out well too! Ocverall, I'd say you can never have too many French Ligne/Legere! I di plan to eventually add one more "Division" of 4 Ligne and 1 Legere, eventually!

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  7. Lovely work Peter. There's nothing worse than having to fiddle around with printer drivers - it is an easy but unrewarding way to burn up a couple of hours...

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    1. Thanks, Lawrence. I have pretty much decided to give up and just move it to my old, non internet connected XP machine!

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  8. Another outstanding unit. I think I will remain in 1809 less I am overwhelmed by all of the additional Imperial Guard regiments!

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    1. Thanks, Jake! There still plenty of Guard units to model by 1809, should you so choose - 1 regt each grenadiers and Chasseurs a Pied, 1 regt each Fusilers-Grenadiers (which tou just completed) and Fusiliers-Chasseurs, uip to 2 units each Tirailleur-Grenadiers, Tirailleur-Chasseurs, Conscrit-Grenadiers, Conscrti-Chasseurs, The Saiklors of the Guard, the Guard Horse artillery, Guard Foot artillery (prior to adopting the bearskins in 1809), Grenadiers a Chjeval, Gendarmes d;e Elite, Chassuers a Cheval, Mamelukes, Empres dragoons, and the pre-lance Chevaulegers Polonaise!

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