Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Spanish Dragoon Regiment "Almansa", 1808





One of  the eight Regimientos de Dragones, the Almansa regiment had sky blue as its facing color, which appeared on the lapels, collar, and cuffs (all piped white), plus the the piping on the pockets on the rear of the jackets. All of the Dragoon regiments had white metal buttons.


The Dragoon regiments underwent a bewildering number of changes in their uniforms, but as of 1805 they were to wear lemon yellow jackets with red turnbacks, lemon yellow waistcoats and breeches, and lemon yellow saddle blankets edged in white. The cloaks were lemon yellow as well, with collars in the regimental color. 


The trumpeters wore"reverse colors", but there is some uncertainty as to exactly what that meant. The most likely interpretation seems to be red jackets with yellow turnbacks, and regimental colored collars, cuffs, lapels,and pocket piping. 





Officers had silver piping where the men would have white; Sergeants had epaulettes in the facing color. Note the slung Dragoon muskets. 


These figures are sculpted by Paul Hicks for Brigade Games, and are really lovely. There are two Dragoon variants available, one walking, seen here, and the other charging, which will be featured in a future post.  


Standards were red with the Royal arms on one side, and the regimental badge on the other (this flag properly belongs to the Villaviciosa regiment, but it's the only one Adolfo Ramos makes). The trumpet banners similarly seem to have bore the royal arms on one side and the badge of the regiment on the other. I have once again used an "impressionistic" style in painting the trumpet banners. 


The standard bearers had a red/crimson bandoleer with silver fringe, and the pole was painted in a red and yellow spiral. The finial should be silver - I'll have to fix that!. Cravats were red. 

18 comments:

  1. These look very good indeed Peter. Very much enjoy viewing your rapidly expanding Spanish forces.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Excellent work! The Spanish dragoons in yellow bring a lot of color to the battlefield.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Jon. "Like a ray of Sunshine.." or a plate of Paella!

      Delete
    2. I choose paella! Best paella I ever had was on the beach in Nerja, Spain. Fantastic stuff!

      Delete
    3. having missed the chance to visit my parents in Spain while they owned a small condo there, all the paella I have had has been in NY City, but still great stuff. Perhaps when I do the Garochista lancers I will tell the story of the "Gaucho Special" at an Argentinian restaurant there...

      Delete
  3. What drunken official was responsible for this uniform?! I love the bright colors.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL, Scott! Godoy seemed to have a passion for military uniforms, all arms of the Spanish military undergoing major changes in dress in 1796, 1800, and 1805! Unlike many heavy cavalry wearing yellow (Straw) jackets, these are specifically "Lemon yellow" - I painted them straw and dry brushed them heavily with bright yellow. Unfortunately, aside from uniforms, he neglected the military otherwise, which was chronically under strength and under funded.

      Delete
  4. Well done, they look great with this impressive yellow uniform!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. mMerci, Phil. Perhaps not a uniform, you'd want to see first thing in the morning with a hangover, though! :-)

      Delete
  5. What a charming little unit! Very nice.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Spanish are certainly a pretty army

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are a colorful bunch for sure... at least in the regulation dress@!

      Delete
  7. Beautifully done. The yellow uniform and blue facings work nicely together.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Lawrence. Your own Spanish Dragoons are excellent as well!

      Delete
  8. Great looking Spanish dragoons, another lovely Spanish unit!
    Best Iain

    ReplyDelete