Thursday, February 20, 2014

Prussian Napoleonic Hussars, 1813

Like the rest of the army, with the reorganization of 1808, the number of regiments was decreased, and the uniforms became more modern, and more somber (relatively speaking, in the case of the Hussars!). The Hussar arm was further diminished when von Schill's regiment, the 2nd Btrandeunburg Hussars #7 was disbanded in 1809 following its participation in his failed raid. The number of Hussar regiments was doubled for 1815, with six new units being raised from various sources.

Prussian Hussars, 1812 -1815


Rgt
Name
Dolman/Pelisse
Collar/Cuffs
Buttons/Lace
1
1st Leib
Black
Scarlet
White
2
2nd Leib
Black
Scarlet
White
3
Brandenburg
Dark Blue
Scarlet
White
4
1st Silesian
Brown
Yellow
Yellow
5
Pomeranian
Dark Blue
Dark Blue
Yellow
6
2nd Silesian
Green
Scarlet
Yellow
7
West Prussian*
Black
Scarlet
Yellow
8
1st Westfalian*
Dark Blue
Light Blue
White
9
Rheinish*
Light Blue
Light Blue
Yellow
10
1st Magdeburg*
Green
Light Blue
Yellow
11
2nd Westfalian*
Green
Scarlet
White
12
2nd Magdeburg*
Light Blue
Light Blue
White
* = newly raised March 1815 from National Cavalry regiments and other volunteer formations.

Barrel sashes: alternating "barrels" in the colors of the regiment's collar/cuffs and the regiment's lace. 
Pelisse Fur:  White for troopers, Black for NCO's, and grey for officers. Exceptions:Black fur for all in the Normal Hussar Squadron, and, from 1815, the 2nd, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th and 12th regiments. 
Plumes: Tall thin white plumes for the troopers (thick Busch plumes for the Normal squadron and the Leib regiments on parade), tall red with a white tip for trumpeters (thick Busch style for the Normal and Leib regiments again), NCO's had white plumes with a black tip, Officers had white plumes with a black base.
Belts: black for all regiments

The 1st and 2nd Leib Hussars were distinguished by the shoulder straps - white for the 1st, red for the 2nd; in 1815 lace was substituted but the 2nd Regiment changed its collars to Black. Both wore the white metal Totenkopf (Death's head) on the front of the shako; other regiments had a large black within white rosette on the front (with the usual black within white cockade at the front top as well, when not wearing their shako covers. The Normal (and later Guard) Hussars had a yellow metal Guard star on the front of their shakos (silver for officers). 

The Normal Hussar squadron (part of the 1st Leib Hussars, "Normal" in this case meaning "setting the standard" for the army) was absorbed in the formation of the Guard Light Cavalry regiment, later the Guard Hussars; by 1815 the Guard wore Dark blue Dolman and Pelisses, scarlet collars and cuffs with yellow lace trim, yellow cords. 


This is the 1st Silesian Hussar Regiment #4; I love the yellow and brown uniform, which is unique, especially for the Prussians.


Note the "wings" on the trumpeter's Dolman.  Some sources say this regiment had black sabretaches with the royal cipher in silver, others the standard red with lace in the regimental lace color, in this case, yellow. 


The standard formula of barrels sashes in the color of the collar and the lace color would give the Erstes Schleisches Hussaren-Regiment solid yellow barrel sashes, which didn't seem right, so I went with brown and yellow instead. The plate of the Hussars in Funken does show this unit with a solid yellow barrel sash, however. 


The Perrys have done these wonderful figures in "campaign dress', so they are wearing just the dolman without the pelisse (boo, hiss!), and they have an assortment of supplies handing on the rear of the saddles!


As my units have 8 figures, this  Hussar officer was surplus; I therefore painted him in the uniform of the Rheinisch Hussar regiment #9.


He can act as an ADC, or as the commander of a Light cavalry brigade. 


One might almost  mistake him for a Prussian Dragoon officer, but the sabretache shatters that illusion!


Here is the Erstes Leib-Husaren Regiment (1st Life Hussars) in parade dress; Old Glory figures. As the hussars didn't carry standards, I should add a lance pennon to the shaft, as some of the hussar troopers *did* carry lances! Note the grey fur on the officer carrying it. These are the famed "Death's Head Hussars"


The sabretache for this unit should actually be black leather, as it was also for the 2nd Leib Hussars, and later, the Pomeranian Hussars. Other regiments had a red cover on the sabretache, with the border and royal monogram in the lace color of the regiment. Note the plume and shoulder wings on the trumpeter, who rides a grey. 


All Hussars had black sheepskin saddles with red wolves teeth border, and wore the usual Prussian grey cavalry overalls with a red strip down the outside seams. 

Sources:
Hofshroer, Peter and Fosten, Bryan, The Prussian Cavalry of the Napoleonic Wars (2), 1807 - 1815. Osprey Publishing, London, 1986
Nash, David, The Prussian Army 1808-1815. Almark Publications, London, 1972

23 comments:

  1. Oooh, they just keep coming. I know what you've been doing during all the snowy days!

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    1. I think we've had 2 1/2 days out of the office this month due to snow, and yes, that IS oart of what I have been doing!

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  2. They look wonderful! I'm impressed with those OG Lieb Hussars - they look every bit as nice as the Perrys. Best, Dean

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    1. I think the OG look fine, too. The were painted about 4 years ago, IIRC. A coat of magic wash would probably make them even a bit better!

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  3. Very, very nice! Renews my desire to paint MY Prussians!

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    1. So.... Painten-Sie, John! :-)

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    2. Jawohl, Herr Oberst! Was kann man tun? Ich muss meine Spielzeugsoldaten malen!

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    3. That's Herr Doctor-Kaiser (on these pages, at least) , John! :-)

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  4. Another useful reference piece! I agree with Dean that the Old Glory hussars do look good!

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    1. Thanks, John. It helps that the Leib Hussars 1) have a particularly striking uniform, and 2) are in full dress. :-)

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  5. Love the Silesian Hussars, great job!

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  6. Great info and figures. Look forward to more Prussians
    Maybe a FOB 1813/14 scenario book ?

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  7. Thanks, Garry. There are more Prussians to come!

    There is certainly more than enough material to do an 1813 scenario book; the question is whether I have the energy to do it!

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  8. Great article and very useful as I'm planning to add more Prussian cavalry to my forces :-)

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    1. Der Koenig needs more troopers! The Uhlans, Dragoons, and Cuirasiers will all be up here over the next month or so.

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  9. Excellent and colorful!

    I did most of mine in campaign dress & greatcoats ... though a few more Hussars could never hurt?

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  10. Glad you enjoyed them! I'm more a fan of unrealistic parade uniforms myself, but we all have our own preferred styles... and mixing it up a bit is fun, too!

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  11. Very nice Peter. The thing I really love about your blog in general however is that I find there is always something of interest here.

    I too will look forward to seeing a few more Prussians.

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    1. Thanks, Lawrence. I try to post a variety of material, and as my interests span from roughly Ancient Egypt to the Napoleonic wars (and maybe someday to the late 19th century), plus some Sci Fi and a bit of fantasy, that gives a lot of ground I can cover!

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  12. Another great reference Peter and some very well painted figures.

    John

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