Wednesday, October 24, 2018

The Black Watch - 42nd Highlanders


The oldest of the Highland regiments in the the British army, the 42nd, officially the Royal Highlanders, but better known by its nickname, "The Black Watch", was raised in 1739.


This is surely one of the most famous units in the British army. During the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, it served in the Low Countries from 1793 - 1795, the West Indies 1796 - 1797, Gibraltar and Minorca 1798, Egypt 1801, Peninsula 1808 - 1809, Walcheren 1809, Peninsula again 1812 - 1814, and Waterloo 1815. 


I have given the piper reversed colors, (dark blue faced red) although they probably wore red jackets similar to the rest of the men. 


The flag is printed from Napflag, and enhanced with dark blue paint to most of the field and edges of the flag, and a bit of red paint as well. The GMB flag was just too big for the Old Glory flag staff!


I left the black ink lining off the tartan for this unit, and I think it shows a bit in the crispness of the Tartan as opposed to the earlier (and black lined) Gordons


There is a dark blue oval on the back of the packs, but it is all but undetectable!


Pipes and Drums, 1st battalion, the Black Watch

34 comments:

  1. Ach Laddie. That's a fine Regiment of Fellows you have there. Great job on that flag!! Painting Tartan gives a feeling of satisfaction too.

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    1. Thank you David. I have found that using paint on the field colors of the free flags printed from Warflag/Napflag greatly increases the vividness of the colors.

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  2. See, you are done and did not go blind after all. :-)

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    1. Right Joe... on the other hand I still have another 40 Highlander figures left, which could potentially be used to raise another two kilted regiments.

      Somebody take them off my hands, please! :-)

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  3. Well done, Peter! I like your impressionistic leanings to rendering the tartan a lot. Fine looking regiment!

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    1. Thanks, Jon. It is pretty hard to do anything other than impressionistic with Tartan, at least for me! Even in 28 mm; a tartan in the actual pattern and scaled size would be... well, almost invisible, becoming just a blend of colors.

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  4. Nice looking Highlanders, Peter!

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  5. Super stuff Peter. Nice work on the tartan.
    They are simply storming into action...!!

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    1. Glad you like them, James. They certainly are energetic, aren't they?

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  6. Always glad to see some tartans and to hear soms bagpipes...excellent job, painting and flag!

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    1. Thanks for the kind words, as always, Phil!

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  7. Superb job, sir! And may i be so bold as to add: "The lads are down to 5 rounds a man, Wellington! Dont worry, they'll stand."

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    1. Thanks for the spirited comment, and the visit, Steven!

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  8. If they are impressionistic, then you are the Monet of the tartan. Great job.

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    1. LOL, Lawrence! Just my lack of a square paintbrush/tartan stamp. I "squared off" the Tartan a bit more with the Gordons, using black lining.

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  9. Wonderful work Peter! They look a fine regiment who will do good service on the field of honour! Nice job on the tartan - I don't think I have painted tartan for about 20 years now...and there is a good reason for it! Yours looks splendid though.
    Best wishes,
    Jason

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    1. Thanks, Jason! Until the past year, I last painted tartan circa 1973 - and that was wasted on airfix plastic!

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  10. Very nicely done, a classic Napoleonic battalion.

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    1. Thanks John; indeed they are a Napoleonic classic!

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  11. Great looking unit, another splendid go at tartan, it's almost tempting but I think my first go with highlanders will probably be for Flodden (without a hint of tartan!) Once again a lovely classic British regiment delightfully done!
    Best Iain

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    1. Thanks for the support, Iain! They weren't THAT bad to paint. One problem is that now I am thinking maybe the Cameronians would look nice in their green facings...

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  12. That's a fine body of men you have yourself there!

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  13. Looks good and the stylised tartan very appropriate!

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  14. I have always felt that doing the tartans in intense detail just makes them look muddy at table viewing distances.

    Thus I have also done a more 'impressionist' approach to tartans.

    BRAVO

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    1. Thaks; a combination of tabletop effect and feasibility, I'd say! :-)

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  15. That's a very nice and effective paint job! They look perfect for the table.

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  16. Replies
    1. Hey, Anderson is a good Scots name! Son of Andrew, the patron saint of Scotland and all that.

      (Just not in my case!)

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