Sunday, May 24, 2015

Prussian Napoleonic Line Infantry - New Regiments 1815

    The post Tilsit Prussian army had a mere 12 regiments of Line infantry, one of which was the Footguards at #8. When they were moved out of the sequence in 1813, a new IR #12 was formed and the old numbers 9,10,11, and 12 moved down one number. With the end of the main sequence of the Napoleonic Wars by the Treaty of Fontainebleau in April 1814, and the establishment of the Congress of Vienna to redraw the map of Europe, Prussia officially regained the large amounts of territory that it lost after the Treaty of Tilsit in 1808, ans hen some. Plans were drafted to increase the Line Infantry to 4 regiments from each of the Kingdom's provinces - the original five of 1808  (West Prussia, East Prussia, Brandenburg [comprising Kurmark and Neumark], Pomerania, and Silesia, plus three new provinces, Westphalia, Rhine, and Magdeburg. Thus the new Prussian Army would have 32 regiments of Line Infantry, each of two Musketeer and 1 Fusilier battalions.

    The manpower for these "new" units came from a wide variety of sources. The most important was the twelve regiments of Reserve Infantry, which were more or less incorporated directly into the Line. Other units incorporated more or less wholesale into the "new" Line regiments included Lutzow's Freikorps, The Russo-German Legion, and at least one regiment of former Grand Duchy of Berg infantry. The "new" provinces were assigned following facing colors, shown on the collars and cuffs:  Wetsphalia - Pink (why they didn't use green, as was assigned to Landwehr raised there I have no idea), Rhine - Madder Red, and Magdeburg Light Blue. The same seniority colors were retained for the shoulder straps - 1st regiment of the province  - white, 2nd - red, 3rd - yellow, 4th - Light Blue.

    That was how it was supposed to work in theory. In practice, the reorganization was very slow to take place - the 32nd regiment was not raised until December, 1815, for example. The pace doubtless picked up after Napoleon escaped from Elba and regained the throne of France in March, 1815. Still, many of the newer units wore their old uniforms, or a mix of old and new. The IR #28, a former Berg unit, for example, still had at least some of its officers still wearing their old white and blue uniforms!

    With all, of the "original" Prussian Line regiments now painted, I still had another 36 Old Glory figures, including 3 Command groups.  I decided to use them by painting three small, 12 figure regiments, one each from each of the three new provinces, thus adding three new facing colors to the Line. Thrills! There being little or no information as to what flags these new units carried, if any, I just chose Prussian standards from the pre 1808 era that weren't assigned to units afterwards. I rationalized that by figuring the Prussians probably took most of the hundreds of standards they blast in the Jena campaign home following Napoleon's 1st abdication in 1814. After all, if Napoleon could confiscate Frederick the Great's sword from Potsdam, the Prussians could return the favor!


IR# 18, 1st Westphalian Regiment

This regiment uses Old Glory figures from the "attacking" bag. 

I liked this pattern of flag; I have no other justification for bestowing it upon this unit!


I wanted a relatively light pink color for their facings. I used Delta Ceramcoat CC Lisa Pink and CC Pink Frosting in about 1:2 mix.


The next unit is IR# 23, 2nd Rhine Regiment.


Once again, I just liked this flag, so, this unit got it (from Napflag site).


These poses are from the Old Glory "Receiving" bag. 


I used CC Adobe Red for their facings - you can see the difference in shade compared to the CC Fire Red used on the turnbacks, shoulder straps, and drum rims. 


The final unit is IR #31, 3rd Magdeburg. 


It was probably still being organized even by the time of the Battle of Waterloo. 


Once again, my only justification for using this flag is that it looks good with their light blue facing color!

The facings were painted using CC Blue Jay.


March written for the entry of the Allies into Paris in 1814. Not ones to rub it in, a second such march was composed for the 1815 entry, and yet another for 1940!

20 comments:

  1. Another excellent post, background and paintjob...well done sir!

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  2. Agreed! Neat to see you tackling all of these regiments and flags. I think not enough people realize that the Prussian army of the late Napoleonic era was considerably more variegated in appearance than might otherwise seem to be the case. How cool to see it in miniature here.

    Best Regards,

    Stokes

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    1. Thank you, Strokes. By the time I'm done I'll have pretty much explored the limits of that variety, LOL!

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    2. Great I'll be using it as reference once again! Thanks for all the detailed posts. Know I seem to keep saying that but heh it's worth saying!!

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    3. Thanks, Mark. I enjoy the details and history of Napoleonic uniforms. Of course, I feel free to bend things a bit where I see fit as well!

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  3. A lovely read....along with nice photos of your work - lovely Prussians! ;o)

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    1. Thanks, Phil. They could be better, but I have another 100 to paint in the next 6 weeks!

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    2. 100 figs to be painted in the next 6 weeks..... do you need a helping hand? let me know!

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    3. Thanks for the offer, Phil! I'm well along with 60 more Prussian infantry, and after that I have 20 Hussars and 4 artillery batteries to do. I think I'll make it with some margin to spare, and if not I can proxy a few units or adjust the OOB for Ligny a bit.

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  4. More good Prussian works! I appreciate the details of the new regiments and I wholeheartedly agree with you method of flag selection. Interesting regimental history as a bonus.

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    1. Thanks, Jon, and glad you enjoyed them!

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  5. I really like the way you have utilised the remaining miniatures in these twelve-figure units Peter. Am I right in assuming from what you have written that these were an unplanned addition?

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    1. Yes and no, Lawrence. The Old Glory order consisted of 60 Prussian privates (Hmm, that sound kind of naughty, LOL) in 2 groups of poses, plus 20 command figures - 5 groups, each of 1 Officer, Drummer, Standard Bearer, and NCO (hey, Steve!). That's *) figures, which would make 4 of my standard 18 figures regiments, with 4 privates and 4 command left over. regiments. As I was planning the units out, I vaguely recalled that I had just such a set of 8 left overs from the first Prussian line units I did back in 2003 or so. I hunted around in the "Prussians and Russians" box, and sure enough, there they were - all bagged and labeled for just such a possible use. So that gave me 96 figures to work with, of which 24 were command figures. 3 x 18 = 54 (which also happened to mean that I had done ALL of the 11 Prussian Line regiments at 18 strong), + 3 x 12 = 36 4 stand 1815 units, total of 90, and all 6 command groups needed. Viola - problem solved, all figures used, and some bonus units for the Preusssisches!

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    2. Nicely done. I find this to be one of the most amusing parts of the hobby, in that it almost feels like a quadratic equation when trying to assemble an order at times. No matter how careful I think I am being, I seem to end up either ten grenadiers short or with a dozen spare standard bearers.

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    3. Yes definitely a bit of Algebra comes in handy when trying to make wargames orders fit your own organizations as closely as possible. I hate wasted figures! It's part of the fun and challenge in drafting up orders!

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  6. Nice looking units. I never tackled the reserve regiments with my Prussians and as a consequence they look a bit generic, but yours have good character.

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    1. The Reserve units are kind of fun to do - se my 2012 - 2013 posts on them. Big variety of uniforms!

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  7. Usual excellent information, and despite any perceived drabness to uniforms the Prussians flags light up each unit well

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    1. Thanks, Garry, and I agree - the Prussian flag designs are a real plus for the army... at least the regulars.

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