Saturday, January 9, 2016

Paint your Wagon(s)!

About 3 years ago while browsing at Historicon, I came across these impressive Blue Moon 28mm wagons (available form Old Glory) and just HAD to have some. I started assembling them this summer, and finally finished them this month.


First up is this flat bed supply wagon. The wagons come with either solid wheels like this one, or spoked wheels (your choice); I wound up going with a 50/50 mix. 


I painted the wood work with a base Coat of Delta CC Bambi Brown, which was then dry brushed with CC Cadet Grey, which has no blue tone to it at all.


I painted the assorted boxes in various dull colors:  CC Wedgewood Blue, Goldenrod, Light Chocolate, Timberline Green, and Cafe au Lait


The various tarps were painted with Folk Art Bayberry or CC Hippo Grey. The tall sacks are painted  Maple Sugar Tan. The entire model got a heavy coat of Magic Wash" after it was painted and sprayed with clear acrylic varnish. 


Next up is a wicker sided supply wagon. 


This one has spoked wheels, as you can see. 


I painted the wicker work with CC Old Parchment, stained with burnt Umber. 


Next up is this nifty cart -carry watering, or perhaps wine of even brandy!  Have to keep the "spirits" of the lads up right?!


The cargo for these wagons  is cast in resin, but the rest of the models are white metal. 


All of the assorted barrels were painted with CC Burnt Sienna.


The ropes are painted with CC Light Buttermilk, and the bands were done using Vallejo Oily Steel. 


Next is a wagon carrying bulk flour. Even during the Napoleonic Wars, Field bakeries were established to help feed the hundreds of thousands of men. 


I added the free traces for the teams using black thread, and used suture-type knots to tie the thread to the swingle bars of the wagon. I brushed some flat black paint onto the thread afterwards to thicken and stiffen it as well. The free end of the thread was glued to the harness of the horses using quick drying Duco cement. 


The flour sacks are painted CC Light Buttermilk, and washed with Burn Umber. 


I terrained the bases of the wagons to match my roads as closely as I could. The central part of the base was flocked with Woodlands Scenics Fine Turf  "Earth", using thinned white PVA (Elmer's) glue. The wheel ruts were flocked using Scenic Express Soil Brown Fine (considerably coarser than the lighter colored "Earth" flock). After each of those dried in its turn, I applied a line of glue to the long edges of the bases and attached Tufts in three different colors, followed by an application of Scenic Express Grass Turf Blend. 


Here's a Wagon Train of all 4 models together. 
"A way out here, they've got a name, for rain and wind and fire..."


I have quite a few uses in mind for these wagons, including the 1809 Klagenfurt scenario, Peninsular guerrilla raids, and as supply/line of communications markers for our upcoming Snappy Nappy Winter 1807 Campaign in a Day. 


I'm happy with how the basing effect came out, especially with seen with my felt roads. While basing these, I also refurbished some other wheeled models I have that needed some upgrading; we'll see those before long. 

28 comments:

  1. Your wagon train is so cool! When I first saw the solid wheeled wagons, I immediately thought of your Hussite Wars project.

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    1. While not a part of that project, the Hussites will be appearing in a game of To the Strongest at Portal Con in about a month.. along with some more Egyptians, in [part courtesy of the Black Tree Design sale that ends at Midnight Sunday! Blame Barry for reminding me of it, and the fact that the sale included Chariots and some Ancient Cavalry, too! So much for a year of all Napoleonics, and already challenging the Budget. I can resist "Ooooh, Shiney" much better than a good sale, LOL!

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    2. BTD figures have been arriving here too. The rapid succession of 50% off sales have kept me reaching into the wallet. No Egyptians for me (yet!) but I have been sorely tempted, especially since I am listening to the history of Egypt. For Egyptians, I think I prefer the Foundry figures. I did get a few buckets full of Trojans and WWII, though. Many of BTD's Trojans and Egyptians seem to be based off the same set of dollies.

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    3. I have to want something from Foundry really badly (or they have to have a sale, LOL), for me to be willing to pay their prices!

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    4. I know what you mean. What is on your Foundry Wish List, Peter?

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    5. Well, believe it or not, I'd like to add another "Division" of 4 French Ligne and a Legere, and they have one more pose that I don't have (the bulk of my French Napoleonic army is Foundry, bought 20 years ago, before their prices went crazy).

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  2. Great looking stuff. I always like the addition of the essential sustainment elements in Wargaming.

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    1. Thanks, Jake. "Wagon Train" and raid type scenarios are a good use of such, with Klagenfurt definitely on tap by the end of the year.

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  3. Agreed. Wonderfully constructed models with skillful brushwork and basing to finish everything off. My favorite is the large wagon with woven wicker sides and a load of assorted cargo inside.

    Best Regards,

    Stokes

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    1. Thanks, Stokes. My favorite is the Barrel cart.... hic!

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  4. Nice looking, Peter...now, where are my Cossacks?

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    1. Thanks, Joe. James and I have been talking about the 1807 SN campaign, and I suspect the Cossacks are going to be a real nuisance to the French!

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  5. Wagons always add somenthing special on our tables, and yours are beautiful...great job Peter!

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    1. THanks, Phil. I agree with their utility for table dressing, even if they have no effect on the game per se!

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  6. Lovely looking results Peter! These scream out scenarios! Campaigns!
    Nice to hear your picking up some Egyptians soon.

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    1. Thanks, David... and I agree!
      I'm actually painting about 30 Egyptians eight now that I had gotten on sale when Wargames stopped carrying the Essex line about 2 years ago. My Egyptians need reinforcements to stand up better to the Assyrians! As always, gaming plans are the great motivator, and the Egyptians will be taking the table top in a week with Barry, and again in February, and perhaps July as well.
      Go Amun, Ra, Ra, Ra!

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  7. Great work on these, and they look like they are excellent models.

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    1. Thanks, Lawrence. They are really nice models, and I don't think I have ever seen them painted up anywhere. The Old Glory Army card discount is applicable to them (as, unfortunately, are overseas shipping costs if you're outside the US).

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  8. Very nice indeed Peter - one can never have enough wagons! Particularly like your use of traces.

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    1. Thanks carlo. THey are good props for sure!

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  9. Lovely looking wagons, especially the wiker sided one, can never have too many very nicely done
    Best Iain

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  10. Lucky for you, the horses are well trained and know where to go, seeing as there are no drivers (drovers?)! Seriously, nice work on those. I love my wagons, limbers and other "clutter" that make the miniature battle look more like the panoramic paintings of the great battles. Destroyed cannons, discarded weapons, broken wheels, dead horses -- they're all good.
    I particularly like your wood color on the first wagon -- the bambi brown with the gray drybrush. Will be trying that one out myself.

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  11. Lucky for you, the horses are well trained and know where to go, seeing as there are no drivers (drovers?)! Seriously, nice work on those. I love my wagons, limbers and other "clutter" that make the miniature battle look more like the panoramic paintings of the great battles. Destroyed cannons, discarded weapons, broken wheels, dead horses -- they're all good.
    I particularly like your wood color on the first wagon -- the bambi brown with the gray drybrush. Will be trying that one out myself.

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    1. Yes, those auto-programmed horses. We will just have to imagine the driver standing off to the side, out of the view of the "camera". Seriously, in this case I think the lack of a driver is a plus, as it makes the wagons suitable for use from about 1200 to 1900!

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  12. Excellent work! I may have to invest in some of these!!

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